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Role of Forest Resources in the Sustainable Development of the Pacific Islands. Part 1
This 11-minute YouTube video was made by the NPF facility of FAO. It was originally uploaded on Mar 3, 2011. This video, called Part 1, is continued in Part 2. The description says: Forest and tree play a vital role in the lives of all the people of Pacific Island countries and territories. Ever since people settles in this region, these resources have provided a multitude of goods and environmental services that have contributed to human well-being and development. Examples are food, medicine, housing and building material, shelter, soil and water protection - all of which are renewable provided that forests and trees are managed sustainability. Besides timber products a variety of forest products with good income potential can contribute to rural development and local livelihoods. It is challenging to achieve sustainable forest management while simultaneously meeting people's needs and maintaining forts service that we usually take for granted. Deforestation and forest degradation continue in many places. Their negative impacts are taken toll on people and the environment. Incentives for improved forest management and exemplary initiatives are needed to change the way we treat these life supporting systems. This video is intended to increase people understanding about the importance of land, forests and trees in the Pacific and to promote the sustainable use of these valuable resources.
Role of Forest Resources in the Sustainable Development of the Pacific Islands. Part 2
This 7-minute YouTube video was made by the NPF facility of FAO. It was originally uploaded on Mar 3, 2011. This video, called Part 2 is actually the continuation of Part 1. The description says: Forest and tree play a vital role in the lives of all the people of Pacific Island countries and territories. Ever since people settles in this region, these resources have provided a multitude of goods and environmental services that have contributed to human well-being and development. Examples are food, medicine, housing and building material, shelter, soil and water protection - all of which are renewable provided that forests and trees are managed sustainability. Besides timber products a variety of forest products with good income potential can contribute to rural development and local livelihoods. It is challenging to achieve sustainable forest management while simultaneously meeting people's needs and maintaining forts service that we usually take for granted. Deforestation and forest degradation continue in many places. Their negative impacts are taken toll on people and the environment. Incentives for improved forest management and exemplary initiatives are needed to change the way we treat these life supporting systems. This video is intended to increase people understanding about the importance of land, forests and trees in the Pacific and to promote the sustainable use of these valuable resources.
Solomon Islands Organic Farming Model for Family Food and Nutritional Security
The blueprint to address food and nutrition security in small outer islands across Pacific island countries and territories that face the consequences of climate change, family food and nutrition insecurity and loss of biodiversity, was developed from the Kwai Island Organic Farming Model for Family Food and Nutrition Security, together with INHIM Community Care, Atori, East Malaita Province, Solomon Islands. Kwai Island is a tiny dot off the east coastline of Malaita, one of the small outer islands in the Solomon Islands. The people of Kwai generally live on seafoods. This model is now widely known around the Pacific. It was costly for islanders to procure vegetables and fruits from the mainland. Their sandy soils hinder the crop growth. We introduced ‘Sup-Sup’ home organic gardening. This facilitates proper waste segregation and island sanitation, as well as successful local organic production of fruits and vegetables of various colors. It is a simple approach that has allowed Kwai Islanders access to ‘rainbow-colored’ nutritious diverse organically grown foods. This small change has impacted greatly on the lives of the Kwai Islanders and has become a success story for other small outer islands across the Pacific. This model (blue print) was developed without money, but with full community participation and cost-sharing, which transformed the whole Kwai Island community to go into organic vegetable and fruit farming: from zero in the past to abundant and diverse food now. This model is a guide to reproduce it in other outer island communities (living on atolls vulnerable to global sea-level rise/king tides), across the Solomon Islands and in nearby Pacific countries as safety net to address food and nutrition insecurities. This video addresses family food and nutrition security in small outer island with sandy soils: Kwai Island, Solomon Islands. This Organic Farming Kwai Island model can be replicated in other outer islands/ atolls/ artificial islands around the Pacific Islands Countries and Territories.
Praxis Discussion on Women and Violence in the Pacific
I was made aware of this broadcast through colleagues in the World Bank, with who we work in PNG and Solomon Islands. It raises issues that we have not dealt with directly in IFAD projects in the Pacific so far. However, gender and women's empowerment are part of the design of every IFAD-financed activity. One specific effort focussed entirely on women's empowerment is being implemented in PNG with UN Women. It focusses on the issues that women face in working in rural marketplaces to sell their agricultural outputs. In this video, the speakers are: Libby Lloyd AM; Merilyn Tahi, Coordinator of the Vanuatu Women's Centre; Zoë Mander-Jones, AusAID and Carol Angir, ActionAID Australia. Moderator: Olivia Rousset. It was recorded: October 2012 in Sydney, Australia connecting to Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste. The video notes that violence against women continues in every continent, in every country and culture, in every minute of the day. Reports suggest that one third of Australian women will experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime; the Pacific region has some of the highest rates of domestic violence in the world. According to the 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality, between 60 and 70 percent of women in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu report experiencing violence at the hands of a partner.
Smallholders, agricultural technology and links to private sector
In this interview with Carlos Sere the IFAD Chief Development Strategist, made by Farming First, Sere makes some basic points about the needs of smallholder farmers. He also sites an interesting IFAD-financed activity with smallholder palm oil producers on an island in Lake Victoria Uganda, connecting them to larger private sector operators in the palm oil indistry.
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